Identity

In Search of a Godly Man-Part 1

The whereabouts of a godly man have become increasingly rare these days. Our culture is pressing in on young men to be fat, lazy, and dependent; the antithesis of who God calls redeemed men to become.  

Mentoring Warriors took on the assignment of searching out key qualities that every godly man will exude.  Sure, each man’s persona will look a bit different…some will be godly men in corporate settings, and others will be seen on the saddle of a horse roaming the wilderness for livestock. Other godly men will be covered in grease found under a big rig solving a host of problems. Still, others will be offering patient care in the medical field, while others are constructing buildings and roads, and bridges for the betterment of society. 

Question you must answer

Here’s the deal. You must answer this question. 

Do you want to be a godly man?  

Do you even care?  You can say you love Jesus till you’re blue in the face, but if these qualities are not increasing in your character, you are not a godly man. You cannot be a godly man without first trusting in Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord.

Over the next while we will examine thirteen qualities of a godly man.  As we do go ahead, be bold, be gut-level honest, and score yourself. In fact, get someone who will shoot straight with you and have them score you. 

Scoring Legend

0=This godly characteristic is non-existent

5=I’m seeing some evidence of this godly characteristic, but I have a way to go. I’m hopeful.

10=Not that I’m perfect but this quality is definitely evident in me.

Let’s Roll

Quality #1. Honesty

“Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper. But he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy.” Proverbs 28:13 ESV

Your word should be fact. Tell the truth even when it hurts. How honest are you? Oh, when the truth is in your favor, it’s easy, to tell the truth. When your folly got the best of you, do you admit it or do you pose and hide and divert and worse yet blame others?

I recall as a teenager getting frustrated with my younger sisters. Every time they rode my bike without permission, they came back with a flat tire. I could bean them one! Sometimes I did and they cried and I got confronted about my anger. I’d either try to justify or blame them for my actions. It’s no fun when I got disciplined. And yet, how can we say we follow Jesus and skirt the truth? Are you telling lies? What drives such half-truths? Fear? Honesty no matter the cost. This is one sign of a godly man.

Quality #2. Integrity

“The integrity of the upright guides him, but the crookedness of the treacherous destroys him.” Proverbs 11:3 ESV

Integrity is a depth of character, whether anyone is looking or not. Back in Middle School, I had an issue with integrity. I could put on a good pose as a nice Christian boy, but close my door and I’d let sin rule me. Lust and sensuality. I was not the same guy. I lied to others and myself and to God. Was I going to become a man of God or was I going to slip into a world of selfish destruction?

This is beyond behaviors. It’s about the core of my manhood. A young man I know posted a photo of him drunk and underage. He looked wasted. He posted another photo of him more recent, healthy, ripped, and not drunk. Bottom line, his first photo was of life without Jesus and a boatload of destructiveness. His second photo was of a man who is now focused on Jesus and on living for him. Albeit not perfectly but increasingly so.

Yours and my integrity can change. We can choose to walk away from Jesus or we can yield to him regardless. Being two-faced means you will get caught, guaranteed, and found to be a fraud. That is not what I want. Sure, I have my inconsistencies but in the end, is it Jesus living through me, or is it self? 

Integrity reveals everything.

Quality #3. Responsibility. 

“Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ.”

Colossians 3:23‭-‬24 ESV

Boys like to have fun. Men take hold of their calling. They sacrifice. They deliver on their commitments even at the expense of fun. Look, I’m no party pooper. We come to our cottage in Canada to reset, to re-shift to a slower pace, to have fun. Fun is not the enemy here. It’s when young men with beards act more like a boy than a man.

I recall my uncle commenting about his 12-year-old son as he ran around the yard chasing other kids.  “One day he’s acting like a man, taking responsibilities. Then, the next he’s acting like this, a boy.”. 

Part of becoming a man is putting off childish things and taking on more responsibilities. Have you ever seen a man who is lazy, only wants to play video games but never works? You can’t become a godly man if the flow of your life is fun, first. I don’t care how many Bible verses you memorized. Look, you can be godly and have fun. Godliness is not boring. When you latch on to the larger calling God has for you, when you grasp what Christ living his life through you is about, you realize that even though there are fun things in life, they aren’t the end all of life.

So, take a road trip with your buddies, and be beach bums for a week. Nap in your hammock, go camping, kayaking, and have fun, but see it in the context of your greater calling to seek God. To do all things for him and not merely to please men. Because in the end, it’s not men who you’re supposed to be pleasing, it’s God. He gives a greater paycheck than even your boss will give you.

Warrior On!

Check out the other posts on “In Search of a Godly Man“.

David Riffel is the Founder and Executive Director of www.Mentoring-Warriors.com. Having gone through his warrior years (18-30) essentially without a mentor, God has placed in him a heart for warriors, to come alongside them in various ways as they figure out life. David’s newly released book, Mentoring Warriors: Coming Alongside Young Men 18-30, outlines principles for mentoring and gives advice for warriors in six key areas of life: self-management, life skills, education/career, relationships, faith, and identity.

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